Tag Archives: Television comedies

2012 Emmy Ballot: Best Comedy Series (Series Conclusion!)

18 Jul

Finally, to wrap up my series on Emmy nominations, I bring you my concluding thoughts and most importantly, the category I care the most about – Best Comedy Series.

In going through these I’ve realized that I definitely have certain favorites that I return to again and again and maybe, as revealed in my last post, some blind-spots. That said, if you’ve been following along, my choices for Best Comedy Series shouldn’t surprise too much.

I was actually disappointed by the lack of Animated series being eligible for this category, as I’m not sure if I would have picked it or not but Bob’s Burgers, as well as South Park, could have been contenders here.

My previous columns are:

For Writing and Directing Emmys: https://ryantardiff.wordpress.com/2012/07/01/2012-emmy-ballot-best-writing-directin/

For Supporting Actor and Actress Emmys: https://ryantardiff.wordpress.com/2012/06/25/emmysupports2012/

For Lead Actor and Lead Actress Emmys: https://ryantardiff.wordpress.com/2012/07/18/emmyactors/

Before I get to my final thoughts, the nominees.

Best Comedy Series:

Parks & Recreation

For four seasons Parks & Recreation has been one of the finest shows on television, with the exception of it’s first abbreviated year it has deserved a nomination every time as one of, at the very least, the six finest comedy program on television. Amy Poehler leads one of the finest ensembles with some of the finest characters and funniest scripts on television. It’s a well oiled machine at this point but I thought this season managed some surprises.

For one, for a show that was already one that used, on occasion a sweet dramatic turn to it’s advantage, it turned into a much more sentimental show. It also followed the longest narrative of any season thus far, taking one larger storyline – the campaign of Leslie Knope for City Council and turning it into two long arcs, both of which rival what I would consider the show’s break-out arc, the one where it became one of the elite best shows on television, ‘The Harvest Festival’ and both of which delivered not just laughs but solid, well won sentiment.

A show that can balance the madcap silliness that can be Chris Pratt’s Andy or Aziz Ansari’s Tom with the sweet love story of Leslie and Ben with an always compelling main narrative pitting Amy’s Leslie against the often absentee (both from the show and in character) Bobby Newport, as played by guest Paul Rudd and eventually the impressive Katherine Hahn as his consultant.

By the end of the season the election was over and the season reached a fine and fitting conclusion. And in spite of slightly anemic ratings the citizens of Pawnee, Indiana will live to fight another season – hopefully it can live up to this one.

Girls

I already wrote at length about the first season of Girls here:

https://ryantardiff.wordpress.com/2012/06/16/adventurous-women-girls-season-one-in-review-nearly-spoiler-free/

But to re-iterate: a quite accomplished and adventurous first season of a show that found it’s voice quickly and managed to excite, entertain, enlighten and engage me every time out. One of the finest shows on television, by my estimation and one that may only figure itself out better with age. One hopes, at least the characters will (but it’s hard to count on it)

Louie

In it’s second season Louis C.K.’s ‘Louie’ continued and advanced on all of the odd, often unrelated misadventures of season one. The series basically serves as a free form video platform for Louis to get any and all ideas out into the world. Be it a short story about his pregnant sister, an odd fable about a homeless man being hit by a bus or one of the longest, most awkward rejections in maybe all of television history, Louie does things it’s own way and does it in a way no else does and no one else can.

In many ways it’s a simple show: Louis, a comedian of seemingly different regard in any given story, goes about his life with few constants, among them his two little girls. It allows for any and every story and in spite of that excites, delights and disgusts with the places it is able and all too willing to go. It’s vulgar, nearly always but sweet sometimes too. It’s everything and one might think nothing as well – it floats and flits so effortlessly from idea to idea that one might want to say it’s inconsequental but it’s only as inconsequental as a brilliant man’s imagination. And I find that very consequental (and funny, it turns out, most of the time) indeed.

Happy Endings

An under the radar critical and cult darling sitcom that is as funny as anything on television, ‘Happy Endings’ managed, in it’s second season to escape from under the weight of it’s premise (of which it’s initial episodes, in my estimation suffered less than people say, but enough to still occasionally struggle) into an ensemble with no weak links and some of the finest, sharpest writing and comic acting on television.

Unlike most of the shows on this list, Happy Endings is infrequently a show that is about much – there are plots and ongoing stories and they’re done well but this is a more pure comedy, albeit about characters we like and care about. But joke for joke I will take Happy Endings over any show on television, bar none and the jokes come aplenty.

The worst thing about Season One arguably, in my mind wasn’t the premise weighing things down so much as two leads of the ensemble Elisha Cuthbert as Alex and Zachary Knighton as Dave weighing the others down and in Season Two both of them are back and suddenly among the funniest and most compelling parts of the cast. Alex, especially blossoms into one of the funniest, silliest characters on television. The show figured them out and figured out how make me laugh. That gets it an easy nomination from me.

New Girl

Speaking of shows that figured themselves out, ‘New Girl’ didn’t get off to a particularly strong start. There were elements that were amusing from the beginning but they never quite managed in it’s first 4-5 episodes to put together a particularly strong front to back episode. Then – suddenly, it found it’s voice and from then on it was as funny, sweet and smart a comedy as any on television.

One of the failings to start was the way they played the titular character – Jess was made into a pariah and seemed like she almost deserved to be, with the behavior she displayed. But they toned that way down and made her eccentric but charming and the show found it’s voice.

It also found it’s ensemble. If anything worked from the word ‘go’ it was Max Greenfield’s Schmidt, the oddest snob on television who only grew into a better more complete character as the show around him got stronger and better grounded.

Adding to it was Lamorne Morris to the ensemble was an awkward fit at first, Happy Endings’ Damon Waynes Jr. was originally cast in, basically, his role but left when that show was unexpectedly picked up for season two (and as we’ve discussed, that was a good thing) and left them scrambling for a replacement – by the end of the season I thought he had been established and made a worthwhile member of the gang. And finally Jake Johnson as Nick, slowly, as the season moved along moved into a position of near co-lead and did so by being quite nearly blow for blow as interesting and as funny a character as Schmidt and even if they’re positioning him for what I think is a mistake of a love story with Jess, he makes for a great foil for not only her but all his housemates.

It’s amazing to me that a show with as much promise as New Girl in it’s early episodes managed, so quickly to become one of the best shows on TV, but it did. By the last third of the season it was easily as good as anything it could be compared to easily on television – from ‘Real Americans’ to ‘White Fanging’ it was one of the most fun and funny shows there is and if this season;s quality arc is to be believed might only get better.

Considerations went to:

30 Rock: A getting older but still effective (sometimes more than others) romp

How I Met Your Mother: Occasionally transcendent but often misguided, it has some of the best single episodes on television and to be fair, at it’s worst is merely interesting.

Modern Family: Consistent. Funny. Not much there there.

Portlandia: Cute and funny but the appeal is wearing thin. Still amusing enough.

Community: Often quite good but often, also, too cute by half.

And in the end my #6 is…

How I Met Your Mother

Probably the most inconsistent of my six nominees and clearly the hardest to justify, How I Met Your Mother is also, at times, one of the very very best half hours of television there is. It plays with structure and expectations in satisfying and wonderful ways and at this point has built character connections with the audience to a point that everything seems heightened. Maybe because of my connection with the characters I have a tendency to over-rate it but there have been recent seasons that didn’t come together nearly as well…

That being said this highlights better than anything what I’ll close out by talking about – doing this has given me a new goal of watching and enjoying more shows and having a more varied taste. While I love cheerleading for my shows – Happy Endings, Parks & Rec, Girls etc. I also feel like, perhaps, I could be better rounded in my tastes. And I take it seriously (if  thousands of words didn’t clue you in) but in doing so I’m somewhat pained to be making exclusions based on ignorance. While I’m a fan and it had a good year, clearly the 6th best comedy on television wasn’t a solid but slightly shaky season of How I Met Your Mother – maybe it was Curb Your Enthusiasm or It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia or Nurse Jackie or any number of shows I have either not seen or just never felt like watching this year.

And that’s why, when Thursday comes and the nominees are announced I’m going to try and not be too upset at the results, even if I’m clearly pulling for my shows (and I truly think Girls, Louie, Parks and Happy Endings deserve recognition and some specific actors, actress and behind the scenes folk) but I’ll try to keep an open mind.

Unless it’s Modern Family sweeping the ultra competitive (in my mind) category of ‘Best Supporting Actor’ again, because c’mon really.

AND

Unless it’s Two and a Half Men getting nominated because fuck that piece of shit.

And that concludes my look into the 2012 Comedy Emmys. I’ll be waiting, anticipatoryly for the nominations on Thursday and I’ll return to whatever the regularly scheduled blogs here are. It’s been a fun project – expect more fun projects as time goes by…

Advertisements